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15-Minute At-Home Labor Training Workout x Parents.com

Go to Parents.com to try our 15-Minute At-Home Cardio Workout.

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Debunking Myths Surrounding Prenatal Exercise #3

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The Myth:

A woman can not lie on her back during pregnancy.

Why this myth exists

There is a risk of the depression of the vena cava (a large vein carrying deoxygenated blood to the heart) by the weight of the placenta, uterus and baby while on your back during your 2nd and 3rd trimesters.

FPC’s answer:

In a healthy pregnancy, lying on your back for a short period of time, for example, the completion of one exercise, isn’t likely to have any repercussions.  In general, we usually don’t put women on their backs during our workouts, but sometimes we may.  (For example, pelvic tilts are a great way to release lower back tension!)  Your body will let you know long before you are at risk.  If you feel faint, lightheaded, nauseous, dizzy, or short of breath, move yourself off your back and on to your side.  Once you adjust your position, the symptoms will resolve with no harm to you or your baby.  

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Move of The Week: Crib Lifts

We are continuing our Functional Fitness Series with the boss babes at The Parent Collective

Check out week two: Crib Lifts!

DEBUNKING MYTHS SURROUNDING PRENATAL EXERCISE #2

Last week we talked about why the advice to "continue the same workout you did before pregnancy" wasn't entirely true.  This week, we're debunking another common myth during pregnancy.

 
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Prenatal Exercise Myth: You can't get your heart beat above 140bpm’s.

 

 Why this myth exists

The heart rate cap was introduced in 1985 by the ACOG. They based this number on a small amount of research, mostly performed on animals and believed that strenuous exercise could affect the fetal heart rate and birth weight of a baby.  Even though they lacked the evidence showing either to be true.  This was debunked in 1994 by the ACOG but unfortunately, news doesn’t travel very fast and doctors still tell their patients this today. 

FPC’s answer

One size doesn’t fit all.  Women who workout are from all different backgrounds, genetics, fitness levels, and overall levels of health.  140bpm’s on an athlete or woman that pushes her workouts hard does not have the same effect as it does on a woman who has zero to little fitness in her life. That’s why we now use what’s called the “Talk Test” or “Perceived level of exertion”.  

The "talk test" being, if you can still talk during a workout and you aren't completely breathless, you are fine to keep pushing.  

The "perceived level of exertion" is being able to push yourself up to a 9 on a scale of 1-10.  10 is working to the point of passing out...we never want to go there, but a 9 is completely do-able, even during pregnancy.  

 

 

Move of the Week: The Perfect Squat

"Squat 300 times a day, you're going to give birth quickly."

-Ina May Gaskin

#GOALS

Join Joanie and learn the ins and outs of The Perfect Squat.