"Do Your Kegels" or Is it, "Never Kegel"?

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For years there’s been a trend to tell everyone to “do your kegels” and we are currently seeing a shift in the other direction. We’ve recently heard both other pre/postnatal professionals and pregnancy care providers telling women they should never kegel.

We’re here to help clear up that contradictory information and educate you on why we think a general statement one way or the other is dangerous.

If you've taken class with us, you are familiar with the cue, "Pump & Kegel".  We remind you to fire this inner core unit constantly.  But why are we so focused on that? 

The muscles of your pelvic floor support your uterus, bladder and bowel.  They are important for sexual function AND work with the rest of the muscles of the core to stabilize and support the spine.  They also support the extra weight of the uterus and growing baby during pregnancy.  

Many of us don't realize that the pelvic floor, like our diaphragm, is part of our core.  Having an over active or under active pelvic floor negatively effects all the functions associated with breathing, digestion, eliminating toxins and moving through our every day lives.  It also helps neutralize intra-abdominal pressure, making us less susceptible to developing a Diastasis Recti (abdominal separation).   Your pelvic floor should contract and release with every single diaphragmatic breath which is why we cue the contraction AND release in all our classes at FPC.

We are bringing a hyper awareness to what your core should be doing naturally because most of us are dysfunctional movers and breathers. We do this because training your muscles to move functionally means that they will be able to properly support you in your day to day movements outside of class as well.

This is why we disagree with the general, blanket advice to either A: do your kegels or B: never kegel. A fully functioning pelvic floor does both! Everyone should understand the muscles of their pelvic floor. Some women need to strengthen them, some need to learn to relax them. If this isn’t information you can assess on your own (many of us can’t), you should seek out someone who can help you assess whether or not you are doing kegels correctly and if you need to devote time to training them to function properly.

If you are given the advice to either kegel or never kegel, what should you do?

Ask follow up questions! Does your care provider notice something specific that has led them to make that recommendation? If so, ask them what they see and what are they concerned about. Another thing you should do is ask for a referral to see a pelvic floor therapist to address the issue. Your midwife or OB is excellent at what they do, but they don’t have the credentials to assess your pelvic floor and prescribe exercises in the way that specialist that can. It’s important to get the help you need.


Want to learn more? Join us for one of our upcoming Protecting your Core and Pelvic Floor for Birth and Postpartum workshops. We’ll teach you to assess your pelvic floor and give you all the information needed to understand how to exercise through pregnancy and postpartum safely.

5 "Scary" Myths About Prenatal Fitness

In honor of Halloween, we’ve put together our top 5 “scary” myths that continue to persist in the pre/postnatal fitness world.

Have you heard any of these before?

 
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You should keep your heart rate under 140BPM’s.

This was a guideline that was recommended in the past but has since been eliminated by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists (ACOG). Everyone’s level of fitness and resting heart rate is different before pregnancy which means giving a “one size fits all” number doesn’t make sense. We now use “perceived level of exertion” or the “talk test”. Basically if you feel like you are pushing too hard and gasping for air, it’s a sign to slow down.

It’s dangerous to lift heavy weights.

This is another guideline that was given to keep the heart rate from going above 140bpm’s. Lifting weights spikes your blood pressure for a short period of time, but so does stress, running to catch a cab, chasing toddlers, and living life! :) You want to lift weights in order to maintain and build muscle tone. Don’t forget you have a newborn that you are going to be lifting and holding on the way. It’s wise to build up that strength now and not once you are dealing with sleep deprivation and fatigue.

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You can continue doing whatever workouts you did before pregnancy.

This one is the scariest myth of all! While many of your pre-pregnancy workouts are indeed safe for the baby, they aren’t necessarily safe for your core and pelvic floor. It’s important to train differently and with a lot more intention during pregnancy in order to ensure a complete postpartum recovery. (Apply that Pump & Kegel!!) Many people that continue their pre-pregnancy routine throughout pregnancy end up doing damage to their bodies (Diastsis Recti and pelvic floor problems) that can cause pain or discomfort for the rest of their lives.

Crunches are safe before you start to “show”.

Fine for the baby, yes. Safe for your body? Probably not. We recognize that every body type is different and some women continue crunching long into their 2nd trimester without any problems, but they are lucky. Bottom line, the more you strengthen your Rectus Abdominis (6-pack) and Obliques, the more strain you are going to place on your linea alba as your belly starts to expand. We recommend you step away from your traditional crunches and oblique work and begin focusing on strengthening your Transverse Abdominis (TVA) as soon as you know you are pregnant.

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You can go back to your regular workout classes when you are cleared at 6-weeks.

You had an easy pregnancy and amazing delivery. You exercised up until the day you delivered, you feel great and just got clearance from your care provider (sometimes as early as 2 weeks) that it is safe to go back to your pre-pregnacny workouts. Doing too much too soon can cause serious lasting damage. Your core and pelvic floor has been under a tremendous amount of strain for many months. It’s going to take more than 6 weeks to heal. In fact, your first 12 weeks postpartum are considered your “critical healing period”. That’s when you body is doing all the work to bring your linea alba back together and restore strength and function to your pelvic floor. It’s great that you feel amazing, but if you misread that as “healed” and head out for a run and then do 100 crunches, you may end up giving yourself a Diastasis Recti or pelvic organ prolapse. (that’s pretty scary). Honor what your body has just been through and allow it to rest and heal. That intense sweat sesh will still be there when you are really ready for it a few more weeks from now.


Questions about pre or postnatal exercise? Ask us in class! We love questions and want to make sure you are moving through your pregnancy and recovery with 100% confidence.

Meet Your Instructor: Amanda Schoppe

 
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We are excited to introduce to you our newest instructor, Amanda Schoppe! She’s no stranger to the pre/postnatal world. Sh’s a dance and fitness pro as well as the proud co-founder of Market.Kitchen.Table, a company specializing in meals for new moms. We can’t wait for you to try her class!

Hometown- Thompson, CT

Current location- Somewhere in Brooklyn

What is your background?- I have always been obsessed with dancing and any form of movement and connection. I moved to NYC in 2003 to pursue a career in dance and spent 10 years dancing with the Radio city Rockettes as well as numerous other shows like 42nd Street ( my absolute favorite show). My love of movement and body awareness lured me to complete my Stott Pilates certification, AFPA Personal training certification as well as become a Certified Health Coach.

What do you do when you don't teach at FPC?-

I currently co-own a Health Food based company called Market.Kitchen.Table located in Carroll Gardens Brooklyn. MKT is a full service catering program as well as a home delivery nutrition plan specifically designed for Postnatal women. Between our events and deliveries I am running from client to client and spend as much time out in nature as possible.

What inspires you?-

I am inspired by confident people speaking their truth, living their dreams and being good humans.

Describe your FPC Signature class-

My class is holistic minded in that I love to create a lot of space for clients to turn inwards, with a sprinkle of hip hop and lots and lots of sweat! Working out should be fun, invigorating and safe! Looking forward to meeting and sweating with you all.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

A farmer.

Current favorite song- My current favorite song is 5 Dollars by Christine and the Queens. It is everything!!!

If you could be any animal in the world (aka your spirit animal), what would you be and why?- My spirit animal is get ready…. a Salmon. If you want to know more just ask.

Tell us something that not a lot of people know about you-

I want to build a tiny house in Maine, and grow my own food.


To Plank or Not to Plank?

The Myth:

It's safe to hold planks during pregnancy. 

 
 

 

Why this myth exists

Women are often told by their care providers that it's safe to continue doing whatever workout they did before pregnancy.  For many women their pre-pregnancy workout included planks, pushups, planks holds, etc.  And if you aren't well versed in the topic of Diastasis Recti, it's not an exercise that you would necessarily think of as a contraindication so many women continue doing them without realizing the damaging they may be causing to their core. 

FPC's answer

Pregnancy and early postpartum is the time to train our bodies with the utmost attention to detail.  For us, that means fully integrating the inner core unit, aka what we call Pump & Kegel®, in EVERY single movement from the moment we find out we are pregnant...if not before!  

We perform what we call "moving planks" at FPC in order to fully integrate the inner core unit and protect the linea alba (the connective tissue connecting the two halves of our 6-pack abs together), from any additional outward pressure or strain.  Holding a plank potentially increases that outward pressure that we are trying to avoid.  When it can no longer sustain the pressure, it can stretch beyond what’s considered “normal” during pregnancy, causing what's called a diastasis recti.  

At FPC, we teach that you use your breath, with a properly engaged Pump & Kegel®, to move in and out of a plank position.  This is the way to safely modify your planks during pregnancy and early postpartum.

 

* If you aren't able to maintain the core integration, if you feel outward pressure on the abdominal wall (pushing out) or if you ever see coning or doming through the abs, you should eliminate this exercise completely.  It's best to perform moving plank work under the watchful eye of a qualified trainer or specialist.  

 


Join us for our “Protecting your Core for Birth and Postpartum” workshop with our co-founder, Joanie Johnson, on Wednesday, July 3rd 6:30-8Pm to make sure you are properly protecting your core during your workouts and every day movements from a potential Diastasis Recti.   

How to Prepare for a Cesarean Delivery

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Art by Catie Atkinson

Contributed by Erin Williams, DPT

Whether you are planning to have a cesarean delivery or not, every pregnant woman should be well informed regarding cesarean procedures. Being well informed will reduce anxiety and make an expectant mom feel prepared if plans suddenly change from a vaginal delivery to a cesarean, and will ultimately set you up for an efficient postpartum recovery.

Since a cesarean delivery is a surgical procedure, there is minimal damage to the pelvic floor and little that can be done to prepare for it, right? WRONG!

Studies have shown that strain and dysfunction to the pelvic floor muscles often occur from the weight of a growing baby, which challenges the integrity of the pelvic floor for 9+ months, creating more stress on the pelvic floor than a vaginal delivery itself. Opting for a cesarean does not mean you will preserve your vagina in perfect condition.

Here are 3 actionable steps which can help prepare you for a cesarean delivery.

  1. Practice a safe and effective strategy for getting in and out of bed now while pregnant that you can implement post-cesarean. This can help decreased intra-abdominal pressure, pain, and strain on the abdominal muscles that are involved with a cesarean delivery. Think “log roll” by rolling fully to your side, swing legs over the bed and use your arms to press yourself up to sitting while exhaling to protect the incision site at the lower abdominal muscles. 
  2. Train and improve awareness of your pelvic floor now as it is part of the “core team” along with the diaphragm and abdominals. Due to the abdominal incision site of a cesarean surgery the pelvic floor muscles work extra hard post surgery to compensate for the abdominal muscles while they heal. A good starting point to increase pelvic floor strength and awareness is to try Fit Pregnancy Club’s Pump and Kegel class as well as to invest in 2-3 Pelvic Health Physical Therapy sessions to dive deeper into engaging the pelvic floor correctly with daily activities. 
  3. A cesarean delivery is a major abdominal surgery, so much like individuals prepare for an ACL surgery by strengthening the knee muscles as well as surrounding hip and ankle muscles it is a good idea to strengthen the core as well as quads, glutes, and trunk musculature to allow for a safe and efficient recovery post-cesarean. Where to start? Hire a pregnancy/postpartum coach/personal trainer or physical therapist to take you through guided safe full-body exercises. Try all of Fit Pregnancy Club’s safe and full-body workout classes! 

There is so much that women can do to mentally and physically prepare for a cesarean delivery regardless if it is your first choice of delivery or not! It is always better to feel prepared, confident, and knowledgeable about all possible labor and delivery options to set yourself up for the best success possible during labor and postpartum!


Questions? Want to schedule a telehealth or in-person Pelvic Floor PT consultation with Erin? Contact information: erin@womenshealthnyc.com or visit her website at www.womenshealthnyc.com

Meet Your Instructor: Erin Williams

Have you ever taken a group fitness class where the instructor is an actual doctor? Nope? Well, neither had we until Erin Williams came around. 

Hometown: Fairbanks, Alaska!

Current location: Jersey City, NJ

What is your background: I earned my Doctorate in Physical Therapy from University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington and my Bachelor's Degree in Exercise and Sport Science from Oregon State University. Additionally, I am a certified CrossFit Coach.

What do you do when you don't teach at FPC? When I am not teaching at FPC my primary focus is providing physical therapy to Pregnant and Postpartum women locally and online through my independent practice! I also coach a crossfit class for pregnant and postpartum women in Jersey City 2x/week.

What inspires you? What really energizes my soul is making movement and exercise safe and doable for all levels of fitness and time constraints. Being a mother is challenging enough and adding work on top of that can make self-care and fitness nearly impossible. I love waking up at 5AM to instruct a determined working mom through an exercise routine before she goes to work because it empowers her to be her best self and that gives me all the energy I need!

Describe your FPC "Challenge" class: My classes are designed to be scaled up or down depending on abilities and fitness level while getting a serious sweat on! My class flow tends to be energetic and challenging!

What do you want to be when you grow up? I want to build and expand upon my degree as a physical therapist every single day, to never settle for knowing enough but always having a hunger to learn more. 

Current favorite song? Happier Ed Sheeran 

If you could be any animal in the world, what would you be and why? Probably a Moose because it reminds me of winter and home, both of which I love and miss!

Tell us something that not a lot of people know about you. I got married on a giant riverboat in Alaska to my high school sweetheart (2 years ago).


Erin's class, "Challenge" is on Thursday nights at 7PM.  It is pre/postnatal safe and 100% appropriate for partners, boyfriends, girlfriends, and best friends!

Meet Your Instructor: Maddy Wasserman

If you haven't taken Maddy's Signature class yet, you are missing out on some serious fun.  Here's a little more about her...including a mysterious story about winning "best dressed" at a taco festival?  Ummm, we promise to get our hands on that picture.  

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Hometown- Ashland, Oregon

Current location- Williamsburg

What is your background-  In 2005 I attended massage school at the Santa Barbara Body Therapy Institute in California. The following year I moved back to Oregon where I received a Bachelors degree in Communication and Culture while working full time for a Brewery start up. I spent 10+ years in the hospitality industry opening and running restaurants in Bend, Oregon and during that time I became a doula, I was trained through DONA (Doulas of North America) in 2010.  

In 2011 I became a certified Barre3 instructor and have been teaching group fitness for the past seven years.  In 2015 I trained with ICEA (International Childbirth Education Association)  to become a Childbirth Educator. And as of 2018, I am now a certified Prenatal and Postpartum Fitness Specialist. 

What do you do when you don't teach at FPC- When I am not at FPC I am attending births, reading books or spending time with the people I love!

What inspires you- My clients! I love getting to know little tidbits about the people I am working with for inspiration of what they need in class.

Describe your FPC Signature class-  Curated with safety, driven by music, and full of education. 

What do you want to be when you grow up? A badass mama!

Current favorite song- Passionfruit (feat. Denham) - By The Golden Pony (It's a Drake remix!)

If you could be any animal in the world, what would you be and why- A wolf. I’m a leader and feel best with a crew of loving & like minded people, AKA my Wolf Pack. 

Tell us something that not a lot of people know about you- In 2011 I won "Best Dressed" at the Arizona Taco Festival, the prize was a 5' tall trophy with a taco on top! (Now I bet you want a pic...TBD)

 

5 questions answered about Elvie

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Contributed by Dr. Erin Williams, DPT

I am not affiliated with Elvie but I am a Pelvic Health Physical Therapist who understands how difficult it can be to perform a kegel (pelvic floor muscle contraction) correctly and I am always looking for tools to better assist my clients with accomplishing a strong and healthy pelvic floor and took it upon myself to personally try out Elvie! Here is what I found!

1. What is Elvie?

Elvie is a small green sensory device that is placed into the vagina during use and connects with the Elvie app that can be downloaded for free onto your smart phone. The app provides strengthening and endurance training exercises with visual aids and performance tracking to better help you connect with and provide feedback for your pelvic floor muscles. 

2. Does it work? 

The short answer is, YES! I found that it was very accurate and responsive to correct pelvic floor muscle contractions (kegel) and would notify me when I was (purposely) doing a kegel incorrectly, or “bearing down” which is a common error made my many women. An important point to note is that Elvie is an up-trainer for the pelvic floor so all of the exercises are geared toward strengthening the pelvic floor and not for relaxing the pelvic floor muscles. Although less talked about, the pelvic floor can have too much muscle tightness/tension (think pain with penetration/sex or constipation) and strengthening the muscles will not benefit this presentation. If you feel like this is you, I would strongly advise getting evaluated by a Pelvic Health Physical Therapist first before trying Elvie. Overall I loved using Elvie to track my progress and identify where I was weak! I am a visual learner and competitive with myself so seeing that I was improving over just 1 week of training and having visual aides to facilitate my kegel was very helpful!

3. Is it uncomfortable/painful to place and use?

Elvie is quite comfortable and easy to place and use! If you feel like you bear-down when initiating a kegel the Elvie device will slip out of you so this can be helpful immediate feedback!

4. Can I use it while Pregnant and postpartum?

Yes, Elvie can be used while pregnant. The Elvie website states that it can be used with non complicated pregnancies and to seek medical advice from your doctor if unsure. It can be used 6+ weeks postpartum. There is no need to use it immediately  following postpartum as the pelvic floor muscles are healing and just need to rest.  

5, How much is it and where can I buy it?

Elvie is normally $199 however for Fit Pregnancy Club mammas I was able to get a DISCOUNT CODE (elvie15b) which you can enter at checkout and enjoy 15% off! www.elvie.com

I would recommend this device to anyone looking to have improved awareness of their pelvic floor muscles for pregnancy, postpartum, urinary incontinence or better sex! I would strongly encourage women to have a pelvic floor assessment completed by a Pelvic Health Physical Therapist first to make sure Elvie is a good fit for you! 

If you have any questions or are interested in getting to know your pelvic floor better please do not hesitate to reach out to me at erin@womenshealthnyc.com and let me know you read my blog on the FPC website and receive $50 OFF your first session with me! 

-Erin Williams, DPT

www.womenshealthnyc.com

Instagram: eewilliams20

Understanding Your DIAPHRAGM and Pelvic floor

FPC's foundation of "Pump & Kegel" is the secret to a stronger, easier pregnancy.  It's a foundational body system that enables us to move and breathe the way nature intended.  We are all born as fully functional movers and breathers but stress, body consciousness, poor posture, desk jobs, lack of activity, etc continue to move us farther away from it.  I always say, once you re-program this system, you will NOT go back to being a dysfunctional mover again.  Our bodies WANT to move this way.  

That being said, just because it's "natural" doesn't mean it's easy.  I love the video that our friend, Lindsey Vestal, M.S. OTR/L from The Functional Pelvis shared this week.  It gives you a few more images to help understand what the diaphragm and pelvic floor are doing and how they work together to strengthen and support you. 

Check it out below!  

 
 

Save the Date!  

Lindsey will be presenting a Pelvic Floor workshop on April 18th as part of the Wednesday night series at FPC! Mark your calendar and stay tuned for the sign up details next week!  

Why the "kegel" in Pump & Kegel is so Important

 
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Written by Dr. Erin Williams, DPT

The pelvic floor can be a confusing buzz word heard in the pregnant and postpartum world where most people know they should be doing something with it but are unsure what exactly! 

The pelvic floor are a group of muscles, fascia and connective tissue that act as a support system to the internal organs, and spans from the tailbone to the pubic bone.  During pregnancy the weight of the baby causes increased pressure and strain on the pelvic floor which is why it is so important to train and strengthen the pelvic floor muscles during pregnancy and postpartum much like one would strengthen the bicep muscle for increased arm strength. 

The labor and delivery process can cause injury and stretching to the pelvic fascia and muscles as well making it critical to give the pelvic floor extra attention after delivery and before resuming prior pre-pregnancy level of activity to avoid pelvic pain, pelvic organ prolapse, and urinary incontinence (ie. peeing while jumping, coughing etc.). A Physical Therapist who specializes in pelvic health can serve as a valuable practitioner with the correct assessment of ones pelvic floor and provide guidance with stretches and exercises specific to the individuals presentation. While many people are aware of a “Kegel” it is not alway advised especially if the pelvic floor has hypertension and requires relaxation and stretching exercises. 


Join us with Dr. Erin Williams, DPT, on Wednesday, March 21st starting at 5:30pm.

 Dr. Erin is be explaining what the pelvic floor is and how to engage it correctly. We will also talk about Diastasis Recti, how to reduce the muscle separation as well as safe exercise prescription while pregnant.  

 

 

The Importance of your Pelvic Floor

 
 

If you've taken class with us, you are familiar with the cue, "Pump & Kegel".  We remind you to fire this inner core unit constantly.  But why IS the pelvic floor so important? 

The muscles of your pelvic floor support your uterus, bladder and bowel.  They are important for sexual function AND work with the rest of the muscles of the core to stabilize and support the spine.  They also support the extra weight of the uterus and growing baby during pregnancy.  

Many of us don't realize that the pelvic floor, like our diaphragm, is part of our core.  Having a over active or under active pelvic floor negatively effects all the functions associated with breathing, digestion, eliminating toxins and moving through our every day lives.  It also helps neutralize intra-abdominal pressure, making us less susceptible to devleoping a Diastasis Recti (abdominal split).   Your pelvic floor should contract and release with every single diaphragmatic breath which is why we cue the contraction AND release in all our classes at FPC.

This function is so important, talk about it at the beginning of every class and we’ve also devoted an entire class to it.  Have you taken “Pump & Kegel” yet?  We offer it every Wednesday and Sunday at 9:30am. 

 
 

Meet Our Newest Instructor, Carolyn!

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Carolyn Tallents is the newest member to the FPC team and we couldn't be more excited!  She's coming to us with a TON of knowledge about pre/postnatal exercise and also happens to specialize in pre/postnatal nutrition so be sure to pick her brain with all your pregnancy food and exercise questions.  

Book a class with her ASAP!  Her arms series is guarenteed to give us all the "mama strong" arms we've always dreamed of.  

Hometown? A tiny suburb outside of Boston, Ma called Norfolk

Current location? Carroll Gardens in Brooklyn

What is your background? A former corporate marketing director turned wellness junkie

What do you do when you don't teach at FPC? I work with pre & postnatal women on their nutrition, fitness and overall wellness  

What inspires you? Seeing the amazing things then body can do - especially while pregnant!

What can women except from your FPC Signature class? To be sore the next day

What do you want to be when you grow up? Great question! I’ll let you know when I’ve figured it out :)

What is your favorite 90s jam? I have to pick just one??? I’ll go with return of the Mack since it’s currently on my playlist 

Current favorite song? End game by Taylor swift and Ed Sheeran

If you could be any animal in the world, what would you be and why? I love elephants! There is a quiet strength about them that I admire. 

Tell us something that not a lot of people know about you. I used to be a die hard Backstreet Boys fan and was convinced I was going to marry Nick Carter 

Debunking Myths Surrounding Prenatal Exercise #4

The Myth:

It's safe to hold planks during pregnancy. 

 
 

 

Why this myth exists

Women are often told by their care providers that it's safe to continue doing whatever workout they did before pregnancy.  For many women their pre-pregnancy workout included planks, pushups, planks holds, etc.  And if you aren't well versed in the topic of Diastasis Recti, it's not an exercise that you would necessarily think of as a contraindication so many women continue doing them without realizing the damaging they may be causing to their core. 

FPC's answer

Pregnancy and early postpartum is the time to train our bodies with the utmost attention to detail.  For us, that means fully integrating the inner core unit (aka Pump & Kegel) in EVERY single movement from the moment we find out we are pregnant...if not before!  

We perform what we call "moving planks" at FPC in order to fully integrate the inner core unit and protect the linea alba (the tendon connecting the two sides of our six-pack together), from any additional outward pressure or strain.  Holding a plank produces that outward pressure we are trying to avoid.  When it can no longer sustain the pressure, it can tear, causing what's called a diastasis recti.  

At FPC, we teach that you use your breath, with a properly engaged pump & kegel, to move in and out of your plank position.  This is the way to safely modify your planks during pregnancy and early postpartum.

 

* If you aren't able to maintain the core integration, if you feel outward pressure on the abdominal wall (pushing out) or if you ever see coning or doming through the abs, you should eliminate this exercise completely.  It's best to perform moving plank work under the watchful eye of a qualified trainer or specialist.  

 


Join us in our Pump & Kegel class on Wednesdays or Sundays at 9:30AM to make sure you are properly protecting your core during your workouts and every day movements from a potential diastasis recti.   

15-Minute At Home Glutes and Lower Body Workout X Parents.com

Don't let you butt disappear during pregnancy!  We partnered up with Parents.com to bring you this 15-minute glutes and lower body workout. Click on the image below to start working that booty!  

20-Minute At Home Birth Ball Workout x Parents.com

Most of us purchase a birth ball to use during labor and then it sits around taking up precious space.  Here's a 20-minute workout that puts it good use before and after pregnancy.  Head over to Parents.com to join in. 

15-Minute At-Home Labor Training Workout x Parents.com

Go to Parents.com to try our 15-Minute At-Home Cardio Workout.

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Move of the Week: Grocery Bag Lifts

This is the last of our Functional Training Series with our friends from The Parent Collective.  Whether we are carrying bags home from the grocery store or lifting items out of our grocery home delivery boxes, this is a move we find ourselves doing all the time.  Learn how to protect your body and gain core strength at the same time!

FPC in the News!

FPC had an amazing press week.  Check out our mentions in the articles below and don't forget to treat yourself to a 15-min, in home workout! 

Parents

15-Minute At Home Prenatal Workout

Well + Good

4 Moves Every New Mom Should Master Before Jumping Back Into Fitness 

Romper

You Really Can Run Through Your Whole Pregnancy, So Why Does Everyone Say You Can't?